Fact vs. Fiction Header

Fake news. It’s everywhere.

Even on our campus. When it comes to alcohol and drug use at Wake Forest, what many students think is the norm isn’t always the case. Demon Deacons party smarter than you think. And we have the fictional memes — and the factual statistics — to show it.


The Facts

Based on the Spring 2020 National Collegiate Health Assessment (NCHA) of 884 Wake Forest students, these are the facts:

  • 21.6% of Deacs don’t drink alcohol.
  • 73.5% of Deacs don’t smoke weed (use cannabis) and more than half (51.5%) never have.
  • 96% of Deacs know that taking study drugs not prescribed to them is dangerous and doesn’t work, so they don’t do it.
  • 84% of Deacs don’t vape.
  • 82.6% of Deacs don’t drink to the point of blacking out.
  • 99% of Deacs don’t drink to the point of getting in trouble with the police.
  • 75% of Deacs don’t drink to the point of doing something they later regretted.
  • 93% of Deacs don’t drink to the point of physically injuring themselves.
  • 99% of Deacs don’t drink to the point of needing medical help.
  • 70 Deacs identify as being in recovery from alcohol or drug use. (If you need information about recovery, reach out to the WFU Collegiate Recovery Community with revocery@nullwfu.edu or @wakeforestcrc.)

The Fiction

Our party memes are all over social media, and they’re brought to you by the same nerdy oldsters who collect and study statistical data about alcohol and drug use among Wake Forest students. Our strategy is to place fiction next to fact ­— and our goal is to challenge your perception of drinking and drug use behavior on campus.



The Ask

We invite you to DM your (better, funnier and smarter) memes to @wfuthrive. You’ll need to send the meme and the related stat (from the list above) to participate in this contest.


The legal limit for drinking and driving for people aged 21 and over is .08. For people under 21, it is 0.
Did You Know?
A blood alcohol content (BAC) of .05 is sometimes referred to as the “sweet spot,” where one is feeling relaxed, but will not suffer the negative effects associated with drinking too much.
Did You Know?
The number of ounces in a standard drink is 12 oz of beer, 5 oz of wine, and 1.5 oz or 80-proof liquor.
Did You Know?
The recommended drink limit is 4 drinks per day for men and 3 drinks per day for women.
Did You Know?
Combining the recommended dose of acetaminophen with even a small amount of alcohol produces a 123% increased risk of kidney disease.
Did You Know?
In people below the age of 25, marijuana is shown to affect short-term memory and cognition, and result in permanent damage to neurotransmitter receptors.
Did You Know?
Approximately 1800 college students in the United States die each year as a result of alcohol.
Did You Know?
Nationally, 25% of students suffer academically due to their drinking behaviors.
Did You Know?
Women are affected differently by alcohol than men due to having less body water than men of a similar weight.
Did You Know?
It takes 1 hour for your body to process and eliminate one standard drink. Nothing, not even coffee, a shower, or a nap will speed up this process.
Did You Know?
Taking prescription medication like Adderall or Ritalin not prescribed to you can have dangerous, unpredictable side effects, including death. Plus, studies show it won't help you do better in school than other students who don't use it.
Did You Know?
There are three numbers you can call if someone is experiencing alcohol poisoning. x5911 and 336-758-5911 work on campus, and 911 works from anywhere!
Did You Know?
BAC is affected by many variables including gender, weight, time, amount of alcohol, hydration, food, and medication/drugs.
Did You Know?
You can spot signs of alcohol poisoning using the acronym CUPS (Cold Skin, Unresponsive, Puking, or Slow Breathing). If you see any of these, roll the person into the Bacchus position and call 911 right away!
Did You Know?
Good ways to help someone you believe may be suffering from alcohol poisoning are: keeping them awake, calling 911 or 336-758-5911 immediately, staying with them until help arrives, and rolling them into the Bacchus position to keep them from choking. Do NOT let them “sleep it off”, give them food or water, put them in the shower, or wait to seek help – they could die!
Did You Know?
Binge drinking is defined as alcohol consumption which results in a BAC of .08. This would equate to about 4 drinks in 2 hours for women and 5 drinks in 2 hours for men.
Did You Know?
It only takes 90 seconds for alcohol to begin to affect the brain.
Did You Know?
Carbonated drinks will raise someone’s BAC faster than non-carbonated drinks, which can be dangerous especially in binge-drinking situations.
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Someone who has consumed alcohol is NOT able to give consent for sex.
Did You Know?
Even a small amount of alcohol can impair reaction times and cognitive functioning. Even though the legal limit for driving is .08, it is not completely safe for someone with a lower BAC to drive.
Did You Know?
Some ways to prevent someone from drinking and driving include calling ahead for a taxi/Uber, choosing a designated driver to drive everyone home, taking the person’s keys, finding a reason for them to stay at the party, or offering to let them spend the night.
Did You Know?
Some ways to protect yourself from alcohol poisoning include eating before or while drinking, drinking water, counting your drinks, setting a drinking limit before going out, alternating alcoholic with non-alcoholic drinks, and drinking slower.
Did You Know?
As of Fall 2017, 42% of incoming freshman at Wake Forest do not drink.
Did You Know?
The alcohol content of a drink is always half of its proof. For example, an 80-proof liquor contains 40% alcohol.
Did You Know?
The typical alcohol concentration of hard alcohol is 40%, wine is 12% and beer is 5% (but can get up to 15% - be sure to read the label!)
Did You Know?
Birth control also slows the rate that alcohol is processed and eliminated from the body. Drinking can indirectly influence birth control’s effectiveness if the individual forgets to take the pill or vomits it up due to alcohol consumption.
Did You Know?
Some students hold/drink non-alcoholic “decoy” drinks to stop people from pressuring them to drink more.
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Consumption of distilled alcohol (liquor) is not permitted on campus even where consumption of alcohol is allowed.
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Serving alcohol from open source containers such as party balls, kegs, or alcoholic punches must be approved by the university.
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Drinking games and practices such as beer pong, shotgunning, taking shots, etc. are prohibited by the university, even if the participant is 21.
Did You Know?
Wake Forest’s Alcohol and Other Drug Policy pertains to expectations of student behavior both on and off campus.
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Providing an underage student with alcohol is prohibited by WFU (and against the law).
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At WFU, cups used for drinking alcohol must be transparent or translucent.
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Students and guests over 21 may consume alcohol on leased patio areas after 5:00pm Monday - Friday and after 12:00pm on Saturday and Sunday.
Did You Know?
Alcohol consumption is prohibited for students and guests over 21 in common areas of residential facilities, but is permitted in private living spaces in residential facilities, common areas in apartment style living suites, and leased and independent lounges.
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Alcohol is NOT permitted at formal recruitment functions (ex. Greek Recruitment or other on-campus organizations).
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Alcohol service must stop 30 minutes before the end of a registered social event.
Did You Know?
References to or pictures of alcohol may not appear on any flyers, posters or signs which publicize a social event, or on the host organization’s social media accounts.
Did You Know?
At approved social functions where alcohol will be served, host organizations are responsible for: Checking the IDs of all attendees to make sure they are 21 Posting at least two signs stating that it is illegal for people under 21 to possess or consume alcohol Ensuring alcoholic beverages are not taken out of the party area Seeking medical assistance if concerned for a guest’s health or safety
Did You Know?
Social events may be registered as BYOB, but host organizations must provide a sufficient amount of non-alcoholic beverages to all guests as well.
Did You Know?
Student organizations may NOT purchase alcohol for social events with Student Activity Fee (SAF) or Student Budget Advisory Committee (SBAC) funds.
Did You Know?

During this time

These are tough times & we care about your health and wellbeing during this period of uncertainty and adversity.

During times of heightened stress, some people turn to alcohol and drugs to try to manage their stress and anxiety. Research has shown that the way our brains respond to alcohol when under increased stress is different and can lead to increases in bringing behavior. Over time this can have serious implications for our health and wellbeing.

If you need help we want you to know there are resources available. We are in this together and we will be back, stronger than ever.

Mission

The Office of Wellbeing coordinates the Wake Forest University Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) misuse prevention, education, and intervention program.  The mission of the WFU AOD is to gain a greater understanding of the dynamics of alcohol and other drug misuse in our community, provide education, behavioral intervention and support, and resources to individuals and groups, and empower students to make healthy choices.

AOD Services

  • Alcohol and other drug workshops and educational programs.
  • Linkage to University Counseling Center services such as individual assessment and counseling as it relates to alcohol and other drug misuse.
  • Multiple web-based resources: online screenings and assessments tools.
  • Consultation to students, staff, and faculty on alcohol and other drug concerns.
  • Referrals to campus and community support services.
  • Support for students in recovery including our Collegiate Recovery Community
  • Alcohol and other drug abuse prevention programming.

Wake Forest gold award iconPrevention Awards

2020 AFA/CoHEASAP Award for Outstanding Alcohol/Drug Prevention Programming – Read about it

2019 Everfi Impact Award for Excellence in Alcohol Prevention – Read about it